Steun hier het nieuwe seizoen van de radiopodcast Kunst is Lang.

Salon

Voor de Salon nodigt mister Motley kunstenaars uit een tentoonstelling te ontwikkelen geheel naar eigen inzicht. Van verzamelingen, tot vakantiefoto’s, van een onderzoek tot een ode.

Schimmel & Schweikle: Speed running

 

Ontwerpduo Schimmel & Schweikle zijn ambachtslieden van digitale materialiteit. Heen en weer bewegend tussen het digitale en “de echte wereld” zoeken zij naar een nieuwe esthetiek in sculpturen en meubels.  Mister Motley publiceert hun salon over onze nieuwe relatie met tijd sinds de computer steeds meer ons dagelijkse ritme en leven is gaan bepalen. 

"For the Mister Motley salon we selected footage that comes from both our days at the studio as our days at home. Our working process is always a mash-up between working very fast and getting nothing done. The computer in particular is a tool that can greatly amplify both respective behaviours. Since the computer is at the heart of our workflow we tend to have a love hate relationship with it. This salon selection therefore resembles our unrealistic desire to always be very speedy even though we know we can't. 

For our most recent show titled ‘A Tree Full of Splinters’ shown at Everyday Gallery in Antwerp we looked into the evolution of craft and the future of digital craftmanship specifically in the world of woodworking. The interest for this subject arose after spending many of our evenings browsing the suggested content page of youtube (something that usually makes up a big chunk of our leisure time) and looking at woodworkers and DIY’ers building stuff in their garages. Other times, during our work hours, we look for new software or digital phenomena that inspire us to create new works. During our preparation for the Mister Motley salon, for instance, we stumbled upon a feature on Bing (a search engine) that allows you to find images that look similar to the image you feed the search engine. We have included two of these sequences where we fed the engine two of our recent works and then kept clicking the next image that looked like the previous one. We thought this was a funny way of associating through a machine rather than using our brains."