Vulva Christi

The perverted adoration of the side wound of Christ and the equally perverted worship of the female vulva 

One of the biggest mysteries of late medieval Christianity is the side wound of Christ, receiving the same kind of worship the female genital, the vulva, receives. 

According to an ancient legend the Roman centurion Longinus drilled his lance into the right side of the crucified Christ on top of a hill just outside Jerusalem, about 30 BC. This clinical act, meant to prove whether the convicted was actually dead, became a motive for the grotesque adoration of the wound in the side of Christ.

Even though all of the 5 wounds of Christ were adored in late medieval times, there was a special kind of worship for the side wound. Not only was it a wound that cut the meat of Jesus in two, like all of the other wounds did, but it was the biggest wound and the only one that gave access to Jesus' Holy heart. The devoted people of that time who were able to penetrate this double lip, the Vulva Christi, was able to touch the heart of God.  

This adoration seems quite perverse in our Modern day, Monty-Python-y eyes and it finds an analogy just as perverse in the contemporary worship of the female vulva. The 19th century French painter Gustav Croubet, who referred to himself as a realist, placed the female organ in the heart of his painting like a Modern-day Longinus in his work L'Origine du monde from 1866. It marks the birth of the adoration of the female vulva.

Just as the people of the Late Middle ages were enchanted by the Holy heart of Christ, the modern day human (or man) seems to be obsessed with the female genitals since L'Origine du Monde. It makes you wonder where that obsession comes from and what it means. What awakens a man when he penetrates the vulva? To create a clone of himself, a sweet child or an unknown God? 

Rinke Nijburg 09 Oct 2017